Telephone 1300 653 724 Telephone 1300 573 243

shipping

Forensic Science by Katz, Katz, Katz, Halamek, Halámek & Halámek

Be the first to review this product

Special Order
We will contact you once your order is placed to advise an expected delivery time

RRP: $246.95
  
Discounted  
Price:$207.44
How do I access the discounted price?
OR OR
ISBN 9783527338948
Authors Katz, Katz, Katz, Halamek, Halámek and Halámek
Subject Chemistry
Pages 450
Publisher Wiley-VCH
Publication Date 2016-01-13
Format Hardback or cased book

Forensic Science by Katz, Katz, Katz, Halamek, Halámek & Halámek

Item Description

Forensic Science - a Multidisciplinary Approach by Katz & Halamek.
Published by Wiley-VCH.
Hardback or cased book.
450 pages.
Concentrating on the natural science aspects of forensics, top international authors from renowned universities, institutes, and laboratories impart the latest information from the field.

In doing so they provide the background needed to understand the state of the art in forensic science with a focus on biological, chemical, biochemical, and physical methods. The broad subject coverage includes spectroscopic analysis techniques in various wavelength regimes, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, electrochemical detection approaches, and imaging techniques, as well as advanced biochemical, DNA-based identification methods. The result is a unique collection of hard-to-get data that is otherwise only found scattered throughout the literature.


Table of contents

List of Contributors XIII


Preface XXI


1 Forensic Science – Chemistry, Physics, Biology, and Engineering – Introduction 1
Evgeny Katz and Jan Halámek


References 3


2 Forensic Applications of Vibrational Spectroscopy 5
Claire K.Muro, Kyle C. Doty, Justin Bueno, Lenka Halámková, and Igor K. Lednev


2.1 Introduction 5


2.1.1 Chemometrics 6


2.2 Trace Evidence 8


2.2.1 Hair Analysis 8


2.2.2 Fibers 11


2.2.3 Paint Analysis 12


2.3 Ink Analysis 16


2.4 Forensic Biology and Anthropology 18


2.4.1 Body Fluids 18


2.4.2 Forensic Anthropology 22


2.5 Gunshot Residue 23


2.6 Controlled Substances 29


2.6.1 Illicit Drugs 29


2.6.2 Pharmaceuticals 32


2.7 Counterterrorism and Homeland Security 36


2.7.1 Explosives 36


2.7.2 Chemical Agents 39


2.7.3 Bioagents 39


2.8 Emerging Technologies 41


2.9 Conclusions 43


Acknowledgments 44


References 44


3 Applications of Internal Reflection Spectroscopy in Forensic Analysis 55
Ali Koçak


3.1 Introduction 55


3.2 Principles andTheory 56


3.3 Accessories for ATR 59


3.4 Forensic Applications of ATR 60


3.4.1 Packing Materials and Adhesive Tapes 60


3.4.2 Paint Samples 61


3.4.3 Drugs 63


3.4.4 Explosives 65


3.4.5 Soil and Minerals 66


3.4.6 Other Developments 67


3.5 Conclusion 68


References 68


4 Applications of Mass Spectrometry in Forensic Science: A Brief Introduction 71
Roshanak Aslebagh, Pooya Estifaee, Selma Mededovic Thagard, and Costel C. Darie


4.1 Introduction 71


4.2 Mass Spectrometry 72


4.2.1 Instrumentation 72


4.2.1.1 Ionization Source 73


4.2.1.2 Mass Analyzer 75


4.2.1.3 Detector 75


4.2.2 Tandem MS (MS/MS) 75


4.2.3 Combination of MS with Other Separation Techniques 76


4.2.4 Applications of MS 77


4.3 Applications of MS in Forensic Science 77


4.3.1 Drugs and Toxicology 77


4.3.2 ChemicalWarfare Agents and Explosives 79


4.3.3 Hair 79


4.3.4 Residues of Gunshots 80


4.3.5 Fingermarks 80


4.3.6 Dyes 80


4.3.7 Glass 81


4.3.8 Drug Packages 81


4.3.9 Paint Analysis 81


4.4 Conclusions 82


Acknowledgments 82


References 82


5 An Introduction to Forensic Electrochemistry 89
Jamie P. Smith, Edward P. Randviir, and Craig E. Banks


5.1 Introduction 89


5.2 Electrochemical Methods 90


5.3 Voltammetric Methods 91


5.4 Electrochemical Methods in Forensic Science 93


5.4.1 Poisons 93


5.4.2 Gunshot Residues 94


5.4.3 Drugs 96


5.4.4 Fingerprinting 99


5.4.5 DNA 100


5.5 Outlook for Forensic Electrochemistry 101


References 101


6 Electrochemical Detection of Gunshot Residue for Forensic Analysis 103
Joseph Wang and Aoife M. O’Mahony


6.1 Overview of Gunshot Residue Detection 103


6.2 Electrochemical Detection of Inorganic GSR 107


6.3 Electrochemical Detection of Organic GSR 115


6.4 Next Steps in GSR Analysis: Chemometric Data Treatment and Complementary Orthogonal Methods 118


6.5 Future Prospects for Electroanalytical Detection of GSR 121


References 122


7 From Optical to Hyperspectral Imaging Techniques in Forensic Sciences 125
Maria Ángeles Fernández de la Ossa, María Lopez-López, Matías Calcerrada, and Carmen García-Ruiz


7.1 Added Value of Imaging Techniques in Forensic Sciences 125


7.2 Optical Examination in Forensic Sciences: A Step Before Hyperspectral Imaging 126


7.3 Hyperspectral Imaging: A Flourishing Technique in Forensic Sciences 130


7.3.1 Fundamentals 131


7.3.2 Hyperspectral Imaging Applied in Forensic Sciences 139


7.4 Conclusions and Future Prospects of Hyperspectral Imaging in Forensic Sciences 145


References 146


8 Biochemical Analysis of Biomarkers for Forensic Applications 151
Evgeny Katz, Jan Halámek, Lenka Halámková, Saira Bakshi, Juliana Agudelo, and Crystal Huynh


8.1 Introduction 151


8.2 Biocatalytic Analysis of Biomarkers for Forensic Identification of Ethnicity Between Caucasian and African American 152


8.3 Biocatalytic Analysis of Biomarkers for Forensic Identification of Sex 160


8.4 Biocatalytic Assay to Determine Age of Blood Sample 166


8.5 Conclusions 173


Acknowledgment 173


References 173


9 Processing Skeletal Samples for Forensic DNA Analysis 177
Stacey Klempner, DesireeWilliams, Kelsha Sanchez, and Richard Li


9.1 Introduction 177


9.2 Bone Evidence in Forensic Investigations 178


9.3 The Sources of DNA from Skeletal Remains 179


9.4 Postmortem Taphonomic Effects of Skeletal Remains 181


9.5 Contamination of Challenged Bone Specimens 183


9.6 Sample Preparation and Processing of Bone Evidence for Forensic DNA Analysis 184


References 188


10 DNA Damage and Repair in Forensic Science 193
Ashley Hall, Lynn Sims, Ashley Foster, and Jack Ballantyne


10.1 Mechanisms of DNA Damage 193


10.1.1 Ultraviolet Radiation-Mediated and Oxidative DNA Damage 194


10.1.2 DNA Damage in Forensic-Type Samples 197


10.2 DNA Damage in Forensic Samples 198


10.2.1 DNA Damage at the Molecular Level 199


10.3 DNA Repair Mechanisms 206


10.3.1 Base Excision Repair/Single Strand Break Repair (BER/SSBR) 206


10.4 DNA Repair in Forensic Science 208


10.4.1 Commercialization of DNA 209


References 211


11 Biosensors in Forensic Analysis 215
Paloma Yáñez-Sedeño, Lourdes Agüí, and José Manuel Pingarrón


11.1 Introduction 215


11.2 The Use of Biosensors in Forensic Toxicological Analysis 216


11.2.1 Inorganic Poisons 216


11.2.1.1 Cyanide 219


11.2.2 Organic Toxins: Alcohol, Drugs, Doping Agents 222


11.2.2.1 Alcohol 222


11.2.2.2 Illicit Drugs 224


11.2.3 Doping 230


11.2.4 Toxins 233


11.2.5 Microorganisms 238


11.3 Biosensors for Chemical and Biological Weapons 241


11.3.1 ChemicalWarfare Agents (CWAs) 241


11.3.2 Explosives 245


11.3.3 Biological Weapons 248


11.4 Conclusions and Future Perspectives 254


Acknowledgments 257


References 257


12 Recent Advances in Bloodstain Pattern Analysis 263
Bethany A. J. Larkin and Craig E. Banks


12.1 Introduction 263


12.1.1 Blood Components 264


12.1.2 Blood Drying 266


12.1.3 Bloodstain Formation 269


12.1.4 Surfaces Interactions 273


12.1.5 Surface Manipulation 274


12.1.6 Blood Aging 277


12.1.7 Future Research 279


References 279


13 Detection of Cocaine on Paper Currency 283
Susan van der Heide and David A. Russell


13.1 Cocaine 283


13.2 Cocaine on Banknotes as Forensic Evidence 284


13.3 Methods of Analysis 287


Acknowledgments 296


References 297


14 The Forensic Analysis of Glass Evidence: Past, Present, and Future 299
BrookeWeinger Kammrath, Andrew C. Koutrakos, Meghann E. McMahon, and John A. Reffner


14.1 Glass as Forensic Evidence 299


14.2 A Brief History of Forensic Glass Analysis 300


14.2.1 Physical Properties 301


14.2.2 Optical Properties 305


14.2.3 Chemical Composition 313


14.3 Current Methods of Forensic Glass Analysis 317


14.4 Future Directions of Forensic Glass Analysis 320


14.4.1 New Developments inWindows 320


14.4.2 Future Methods of Glass Analysis 325


14.5 Conclusions 329


Acknowledgment 329


References 329


15 Forensic Examination of Trace Evidence 337
Virginia M. Maxwell


15.1 What Is Trace Evidence? 337


15.2 Major Types of Trace Evidence 342


15.2.1 Hairs 342


15.2.2 Fibers 347


15.2.3 Paint 351


15.2.4 Glass 355


15.2.5 Soil 357


15.2.6 Tape 360


15.2.7 Structural Materials 362


15.2.8 Lamp Filaments 363


15.2.9 Physical Match 364


15.2.10 Miscellaneous Trace Materials 365


15.3 Limitations and Significance of Trace Evidence 365


References 366


16 Fingerprint Spoofing and Liveness Detection 373
Peter Johnson and Stephanie Schuckers


16.1 Introduction 373


16.2 Fingerprint Spoofing 374


16.2.1 Spoofing Methods 374


16.2.2 Spoofing AFIS 376


16.2.3 Spoofing in Forensics 376


16.2.4 Documented Spoof Attempts in the Field 377


16.3 Liveness Detection 377


16.3.1 Hardware-Based Liveness Detection 379


16.3.2 Software-Based Liveness Detection 380


16.4 Summary 381


References 381


17 Engineering as a Forensic Science 383
Steven C. Batterman and Scott D. Batterman


17.1 Introduction 383


17.2 Accident Reconstruction 385


17.3 Biomechanics of Injuries 388


17.4 Products Liability 391


17.4.1 Design Defects 392


17.4.2 Manufacturing Defects 394


17.4.3 Failure toWarn and Instruct 394


17.4.4 General Product Design Considerations 395


17.5 Conclusion 397


References 397


Further Reading 398


18 Unmanned Systems Technology Use by Law Enforcement 401
Anthony Hallett and Victor Weedn


18.1 Evolution and Anatomy of Unmanned Systems 402


18.2 Law Enforcement Applications 403


18.2.1 Bomb Disposal Applications 404


18.2.2 Search and Rescue Applications 404


18.2.3 Standoff and Hostage Negotiation Applications 405


18.2.4 Crime Scene Imaging and Reconstruction Applications 405


18.3 Legal Issues 405


18.3.1 Regulations 406


18.3.2 Privacy 407


18.3.3 Weaponization 408


18.4 Unmanned Systems Deployment 409


18.4.1 Top Reasons Law Enforcement Agencies Hesitate to Deploy Drones 409


18.4.2 Deployment Models 410


18.4.3 SIDEBAR – Law Enforcement Applications 411


References 412


19 Forensic Science – Conclusions and Perspectives 415
Evgeny Katz and Jan Halámek


Index 417